5 Plants for Your Homestead YCH#53

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Osage Orange

http://www.racehorseherbal.com/Wild_Herbs/Osage_Orange/osage_orange.html

http://www.eattheweeds.com/maclura-pomifera-the-edible-inedible-2/

Cornelian Cherry

http://tcpermaculture.blogspot.com/2012/04/permaculture-plants-cornelian-cherry.html

Japanese heartnut

http://www.songonline.ca/nuts/heartnut.htm

Virginia Cherry Shrub

Virginia cherry is a very nice adaptable native cherry that grows to 10 feet tall, but is usually shorter and bushy. It produces red edible cherries in summer that are edible and best when dead ripe. They are best described as sour cherries. I will eat them fresh right off the plant when fully ripe but some prefer to use them in syrup, jams and jellies. They are hardy from zone 3-8. They will grow in full sun or shade.

 

Russian Black Mulberry

One of the most productive, adaptable, fast growing and trouble free  tree available.  Extra sweet, purple-black juicy fruit is great for  pies and eating fresh.  Self-pollinating tree.   Zones  4-9. 2-3’feet tall tree sent.

 

Plants for Edible Water Gardens, Spring Fever, Jiaogulan, Beansprouts YCH# 52

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  • Edible Water Gardens Can Be:

  • Natural Ponds
  • Artificial Ponds
  • Aquaponics Systems

Natural ponds have the advantage that you could grow colonies op plants.  Be careful not to introduce non native, invasive species into ponds that can spread to greater waterways. Artificial ponds can be anything from a container that holds a few plants in water, to a kiddie pool, to a larger pond with a liner with different heights and waterfalls.  These could be very easy to set up and easy to maintain. Aquaponics Systems grow fish and plants together. The advantage is the fish feed the fish can be harvested for eating.

Aquatic Plants Grow at Different Depths:

Marginal Plants: Don’t have to be in the water; but like wet soil. Good for the ponds edge.

  • Achira (Canna edulis)
  • Arrowhead (Sagittaria latifolia)
  • Belembe, tannier  (Xanthosoma brasilense)
  • Cranebrake bamboo  (Arundinaria gigantean)
  • Chufa  (Cyperus esculentus)
  • Daylily  (Hemerocallis fulva)
  • Fuki ( Petacites japonicaus)
  • Groundnuts  (Apios Americana)
  •  Ostrich Fern  (Matteucia struthiopteris)
  • Ramps  (Allium tricoccum)
  • Skirret  (Sium sisarum)
  • Taro (Colocasia esculenta)
  • Wasabi  (Wasabi japonica)
  • Water celery  (Oenanthe sarmentosa)
  • Water mimosa  (Neptunia oleracea)
  • Water Mint (Mentha aqautica)
  • Water spinach  (Ipomoea aquatic)
  • Watercress  (Nasturcium officiale)
  • Wild rice (fritillaria camshatcenussi)

Emergent Aquatics:  Grow underwater and send leaves up above the surface. For shallow water 3-4 inches deep:

  • Taro   (Colocasia esculenta)
  • Violet stem taro   (Colocasia esculenta)
  • Water chestnut  (Eleocharis dulcis)
  • Licorice flag (Acorus gramineus)  can be grown in bog or shallow water
  • Tsi  (Houttuynia cordata) can be grown in bog or shallow water

For deeper water – 2 ft.

  • Water lotus  (Nelumbo mucifera)
  • Arrowhead  (Saggitaria spp.)
  • Cattails (Typha spp.)
  • Pickerel rush  (Pontederia cordats)

Floating Aquatics: Grow on the surface of the water.  They provide shade and prevent algae from growing.

  • Water mimosa  (Neptunia oleracea)
  • Duckweeds  (Lemma spp.)
  • Water meal  (Wolfia spp.)
  • Asian water meal  (Wolfia globosa)
  • Azola  (Azola spp)

Emergent Floaters:  Grow as floating mats or in partially submerged pots.

  • Water celery  (Oenanthe sarmentosa)
  • Water spinach  (Ipomoea aquatic)
  • Watercress  (Nasturcium officiale)

Submerged Aquatics:  Grow mostly underwater and help prevent algae by using up dissolved nutrients.

  • Coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum)
  • Whorl leaved water milfoil (Myriophyllum verticillanum)
  • Sago pondweed (Stuckenia pectinatus)
  • Eelgrass (Vallisneria Americana)

 

Link for Jiaogulan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5DwcnZ8XYk

Edible Water Gardens, Seed Balls, Blueberries, Motherwort, Getting Ready For Spring YCH # 51

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What To Do With All Those Old Seeds – Seed Balls:

A seed ball is also called “earth ball”.  It is a variety of seeds rolled into a ball with clay.  Also humus or compost may be added as microbial inoculants.  Cotton-fibres or liquefied paper may be added to strengthen the outside  to protect the clay ball.  Especially for throwing it or in harsh habitats.

This technique was used in the ancient Middle East, Egypt and Northern Africa.  It was used in Egypt to repair farms after the spring flooding of the Nile.  During World War 2,  a Japanese scientist named Masanobu Fukuoka rediscovered this technique.    He was looking for a way to increase food production without taking away  land allocated for rice farming on the mountainous island of Shikoku.

The basic procedure for making seed balls is 5 parts red clay to 1 part seeds. 1 -3 Parts compost may also be added.  Mix seeds and compost, then add in  clay and enough water to form the balls.

Seed balls have been used all over the world to reseed ecosystems, while avoiding insects and animals and protecting seeds until rain falls.  They can then germinate when the time is right.

Seed balls have become popular with guerilla gardening in urban areas.  And are even available for purchase now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_ball

Here is a link to a cute article on seed bombs. http://www.guerrillagardening.org/ggseedbombs.html

Edible Water Garden

Edible water gardens are:

  1. Sustainable -Once planted, just top the water off
  2. Easy to grow- Very little weeds, no spraying or watering
  3. Beautiful- They add beauty to your yard, balcony or home
  4. Productive- A lot of food can be grown in a small space
  5. Entertaining- You can relax and watch frogs, lizard, birds, dragonflies, fish, etc. interact and listen to water falls or bubbling water.

List of Plant for Edible Water Garden: http://www.ozwatergardens.com.au/edible-aquatic-plants

http://www.thestarpress.com/article/20140209/NEWS01/302090031/Glynn-Barber

Disclaimer:

The following information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Gale nor I take any responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from implementing the herb and supplement information we provide. I (Divinia) am not a medical practitioner, and while Gale is an RN, neither this podcast, nor her blog is an attempt to practice medicine. The information we provide does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care providers. You should seek the advice of your physician or other health care providers before engaging in any complementary medical technique. This includes the use of natural or herbal remedies. You should be aware that many of the natural remedies we talk about have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Also, the use of some herbs and supplements along with certain over the counter or prescription medications may cause adverse reactions.

 

BLUEBERRIES:

…the why, what, where, and how of Blueberries:

The three kinds I will be planting this year:

Dwarf Nothblue: http://www.gurneys.com/product/dwarf_northblue_blueberry/blueberry-plants

Blueray: http://www.burpee.com/fruit-plants/blueberry-plants/blueberry-blueray-prod000513.html?catId=3048

Healthy Rubel: http://www.gurneys.com/product/healthy_rubel_blueberries/blueberry-plants

…the health benifits of blueberries:

Immune System Booster

http://www.blueberry.org/antioxidants.htm

Vision Improvement

http://www.livestrong.com/article/113796-health-benefits-eating-blueberries/

Belly Fat Loss

http://www.webmd.com/heart/news/20090419/blueberries-may-banish-belly-fat

Bone Health

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2011/110621.htm

Relief/Prevention of Constipation

http://www.livestrong.com/article/356471-blueberries-constipation/

Brain food

http://www.naturalnews.com/news_000576_blueberries_memory_loss_alzheimers.html

Heart health

http://www.uofmhealth.org/News/1113benefits-of-blueberries

Blood Sugar Stabilizer

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=8

Cancer-Fighter

http://www.livestrong.com/article/471692-can-blueberries-shrink-cancer-cells/

Bladder Aid

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20306607_3,00.html

Basic blueberry types include:

Lowbush (cold tolerant, less productive),

Northern Highbush (zone 5-7 or colder),

Southern Highbush (zones 7-10),

Rabbiteye (best for southern growers)

Saskatoon (not a true blueberry, but extremely cold tolerant).

Plant at least two, preferably three variates for best production.

Check with your local USDA Extension Office to find out what varieties are best for you to grow:http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/

Blueberries grow best with an acid soil pH between 4 and 5.5

Decrease soil PH with coffee grinds, peat moss, green pine needles or a soil amendment high in sulfur like Espoma Orcanic Soil Acidifier: http://www.espoma.com/p_consumer/pdf/products/Esp_Soil_acidif.pdf

Use acidic soil loving plants for companions. Here’s a link to a great chart of plants divided by their Acid/Alkaline preference:

http://lazycompost.com/pH.shtml (It’s the ONLY one I found that listed strawberries and cranberries, which is what I will be using.

Laurie over at Common Sense Homesteading has more information on growing, watering and how she keeps birds off her bushes:

http://www.commonsensehome.com/blueberries-growing-the-superfruit/

and another great link for growing blueberries and their benefits:

http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/blueberries?page=0,1 

  Motherwort – Leonurus cardiaca

The uses of Motherwort, the doses of Motherwort, the precautions you should take with Motherwort, how to grow Motherwort and other Motherwort information can be found at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonurus_cardiaca

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/herbal-remedies/motherwort-herbal-remedies.htm

http://herbgardens.about.com/od/medicinalherbs/p/How-To-Grow-And-Use-Motherwort-In-The-Herb-Garden.htm

http://www.health-care-tips.org/herbal-medicines/motherwort.htm

Some of you may need to read Wellness Mama’s tutorial “How to make Herbal Tinctures” if you don’t already know how:

http://wellnessmama.com/8168/how-to-make-herbal-tinctures/

Aqauponics, Resistant Starches, Chlorella, Cod Liver Oil YCH # 50

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Time Stamp For Podcast:

I have decided to try and add a time stamp for the podcast.  it is a little more work, but I believe this will benefit people in being able to quickly find info they are interested in.  Let me know if this is worthwhile to you.

00-28.30 Aqauponics by Gale  Basic system set up and part.  My plans, the cheap and easy way.

28.33-32.00 Resistant Starch/Prebiotics – Gale & Divinia

32.00 – 32.53 Jerusalem Artichokes

32.53-35.44 Cod Liver Oil and rheumatoid Arthritis – Divinia & Gale

36.50-40.14 Chlorella – Divinia & Gale

40.14-43.53 Pet poisoning from old dairy (mycotoxins)  Divinia & Gale

44.04-45.43  Hardy lentil soup Recipe Divinia

45.43-end farm updates, invading dogs. How effective are electric fences, possible option of livestock guardian dog.

Times may be off a little.  edited 3 times.  Thanks audacity!

Links:

Here is nice link that gives a quick easy to understand detailed explanation on aquaponics:

http://www.gardenfork.tv/hydroponics-plus-fish-farm-equals-aquaponics-a-how-to

Aquaponics the cheap way.  Travis Hughey’s Barrelponics PDF: http://www.aces.edu/dept/fisheries/education/documents/barrel-ponics.pdf

What about food grade grow beds.  An idea for using cheap plastic and making is safer.

Use a food safe liner: http://www.theaquaponicstore.com/6-Wide-Dura-Skrim-s/216.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfrvXtC0Kk0

40 aquaponic growbeds for 13 cents a day http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiHVHdlmRL0&list=PL17i08QeSc5UYNTIShlay17YQfE6jPYP3

Travis Hughey’s site  http://www.fastonline.org/

See the mechanical pump.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLIr3naUzK4

http://thegreenfarmacygarden.com/2013/10/06/jim-dukes-songbook-for-the-2013-aceer-legacy-award/

http://www.japan-aquaponics.com/micro-aquaponics-plans.html

HEALTH

~I found an article that one of our listeners might find really interesting at the healthy Home Economist dot com:

Study Shows Cod Liver Oil Reduces Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/cod-liver-oil-reduces-rheumatoid-arthritis-pain/

## and I want to thank Maia for reaching out to me and thank you for all your kind words about Gale and me and this podcast.##

~I found an interesting article on Chlorella at natural news dot com

http://www.naturalnews.com/043663_chlorella_superfood_disease_prevention.html#ixzz2rcQGzJB3

and I believe I will give it a try:

Tablet (for starters to see if it’s worth taking)

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-greenfoods-formulas-broken-cell-wall-chlorella-500-mg-360-tabs

Powder (for after I’ve found it’s worth taking and will add it to juice when I start juicing)

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-greenfoods-formulas-certified-organic-chlorella-powder-90-grams-3-17-oz-pwdr?csi=SWR006&csp=SWR064

PET HEALTH

~Someone posted a warning on facebook about dogs getting strychnine poisoning from eating old dairy products. I found this difficult to believe and found the following abstract posted at PupMed dot gov::

Tremorgenic mycotoxin intoxication with penitrem A and roquefortine in two dogs.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12523480

RECIPELentil Soup

Ingredients:

2 Chicken Leg Quarters

1# Sorted and washed Lentils
1.5# Thawed Frozen Tomatoes (any tomatoes will do)
¼ Cup dry minced onions (any onions will do)
1 TBS. Granulated Garlic
1 TBS Parsley
1 TBS Lawry’s Seasoned Salt

Fill dutch oven about ¾ of the way with water, a little salt, and leg quarters. Boil until done about 30 minutes. Remove chicken and set aside (I usually put in the fridge) to cool. Add sorted and washed Lentils and seasoning. Bring to boil for about 10 minutes. When cool enough pick chicken from the bone, large pieces should be cut to be spoon/bite size. Add tomatoes and and chicken to the pot and reduce heat to simmer. Simmer for about 10 minutes and remove from heat. Leave covered for a while to let the seasoning permeate the chicken while it cools a little. Makes about 6 servings.

teresting article on resistant starch: http://freetheanimal.com/2013/12/resistant-primer-newbies.html

 

 

Aquaponic Gardening With Sylvia Bernstein YCH #49

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I feel so honored that Sylvia agreed to come on and chat about aquaponics.  Sylvia is a wonderful teacher and loves aquaponics.  She even gave up a dream job to pursue her love for this.  I am linking below to her website, aquaponic community, Facebook page, book, and You Tube Channel.  If you’re not so sure about all this; please check out her awesome You Tube channel.  I am so impressed by this lady and just love her videos and book.  I felt like we were old friends even before I met her on Skype!
Aquaponic Gardening Community: http://community.theaquaponicsource.com/
Also a link to Travis Hughey’s  You Tube Channel on Barrelponics: (cheap way to go): http://www.youtube.com/user/barrelponic
Check out The Urban Farming Guys: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfR9nDsvBk8
Barrelponics pdf.  Detailed instructions on how to do barrelponics.  I think this is the cheapest way to go!  Check it out here:
And below is just a fun, interesting link I came across of Facebook.

BOLD: "Stagecoach" Mary Fields (1832-1914), the first African American mail carrier (male or female) in the United States</p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Mary Fields began her life as a slave in Tennessee in 1832, the exact date is unknown.  Mary’s mother Susanna was the personal servant to the plantation owner’s wife, Mrs. Dunnes.  The plantation wife also had a daughter who was born within two weeks of Mary, and named Dolly. Mrs. Dunne allowed the children to play together.  Over the years Mary was taught to read and write and the two girls became best friends.  At sixteen, Dolly was sent to boarding school in Ohio and Mary was left all alone.</p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Mary’s father worked in the fields on the Dunnes’ farm.  He was sold after Mary was born.  Mary’s mother wanted her daughter to have a last name, so since her father Buck worked in the fields, her mother decided her last name should be Fields.  So thus Mary Fields came to be.   After Mary’s mother passed away, Mary became the head of the household at the young age of fourteen. </p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>After Dolly went away to boarding school, The Civil War began.  The slaves were left to fend for themselves.  It was during this time that she learned many life survival skills.  She learned how to garden, raise chickens and practice medicine with natural herbs. </p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Around the age of 30 Mary heard from her dear friend Dolly.  Dolly was now a nun and was renamed Sister Amadaus. The Sister asked Mary to join her at a convent in Ohio.  Mary immediately began her twenty-day trip from Tennessee to Ohio.   Mary remained with the Ursuline Sisters for many years – even when Dolly relocated to the St. Peter’s Mission in Montana.   Mary never married and she had no children.  The nuns were her family.  She protected the nuns.</p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Mary wanted to follow her friend to Montana, but was told it was too remote and rustic.  However, that all changed when Mother Amadaus became ill with pneumonia and wrote to Mary asking for her support and healing.  Mary wasted no time and departed for Montana by stagecoach in 1885.  At 53 years old Mary started her new life in Montana.   Mary helped nurse Mother Amadaus back to health.  The sisters were all in amazement of this tough black woman.  Mary was no stranger to rolling a cigar, shooting guns and drinking whiskey.  She grew fresh vegetables that were enjoyed by the Sisters and the surrounding community.  Mary was forced to leave her beloved mission and the Sisters after a shooting incident.  Mary shot in self-defense, and was found innocent, but had to find a new home. </p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Wells Fargo had the mail contract during that time and was looking for someone for the Great Falls to Fort Benton route to deliver the U.S. Mail.  It was a rough and rugged route and would require a person of strong will and great survival skills to maneuver the snowy roads and high winds.  Mary immediately applied at the ripe age of 60 years old.  It was rumored that she could hitch a team of horses faster than the boys half her age and due to her toughness, she was hired!  Mary became the first African American mail carrier in the United States and the second woman.  Mary was proud of the fact that her stage was never held up.  Mary and her mule Moses, never missed a day and it was during this time that she earned the nickname of “Stagecoach,” for her unfailing reliability.</p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>The townspeople adopted Mary as one of their own.  They celebrated her birthday twice a year since she didn’t know the exact date of her real birthday. Mary Fields was known as Black Mary and Stagecoach Mary.  She was considered an eccentric even in these modern times.  She was six feet tall and over 200 pounds.    By the time she was well known in Central Montana, she had a pet eagle, a penchant for whiskey, baseball (which was a new sport at the time) and a heart as big as the gun she was famous for carrying.  Mary wore a buffalo skin dress that she made herself – you might say she drew attention wherever she went – even in a small western pioneer town.  Mary was a local celebrity and her legend and tales of her adventures were known by surrounding communities and neighboring states. </p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Gary Cooper (the actor) had his mail delivered by Mary as a young boy in Cascade County.   As an adult, he wrote about her for Ebony Magazine in 1955.  Her wrote of her kindness and his admiration for her. The famous western artists Charlie Russell drew a sketch of her.  It was a pen and ink sketch of a mule kicking over a basket of eggs with Mary looking none to happy. </p><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Mary retired her post in 1901 and passed away in 1914.  She is buried at Highland Cemetery at St. Peter’s Mission.  Her grave is marked with a simple cross.

0
BOLD: “Stagecoach” Mary Fields (1832-1914), the first African American mail carrier (male or female) in the United States Mary Fields began her life as a slave… in Tennessee in 1832, the exact date is unknown.  Mary’s mother Susanna was the personal servant to the plantation owner’s wife, Mrs. Dunnes.  The plantation wife also had a daughter who was born within two weeks of Mary, and named Dolly. Mrs. Dunne allowed the children to play together.  Over the years Mary was taught to read and write and the two girls became best friends.  At sixteen, Dolly was sent to boarding school in Ohio and Mary was left all alone.  Mary’s father worked in the fields on the Dunnes’ farm.  He was sold after Mary was born.  Mary’s mother wanted her daughter to have a last name, so since her father Buck worked in the fields, her mother decided her last name should be Fields.  So thus Mary Fields came to be.   After Mary’s mother passed away, Mary became the head of the household at the young age of fourteen.   After Dolly went away to boarding school, The Civil War began.  The slaves were left to fend for themselves.  It was during this time that she learned many life survival skills.  She learned how to garden, raise chickens and practice medicine with natural herbs.   Around the age of 30 Mary heard from her dear friend Dolly.  Dolly was now a nun and was renamed Sister Amadaus. The Sister asked Mary to join her at a convent in Ohio.  Mary immediately began her twenty-day trip from Tennessee to Ohio.   Mary remained with the Ursuline Sisters for many years – even when Dolly relocated to the St. Peter’s Mission in Montana.   Mary never married and she had no children.  The nuns were her family.  She protected the nuns.  Mary wanted to follow her friend to Montana, but was told it was too remote and rustic.  However, that all changed when Mother Amadaus became ill with pneumonia and wrote to Mary asking for her support and healing.  Mary wasted no time and departed for Montana by stagecoach in 1885.  At 53 years old Mary started her new life in Montana.   Mary helped nurse Mother Amadaus back to health.  The sisters were all in amazement of this tough black woman.  Mary was no stranger to rolling a cigar, shooting guns and drinking whiskey.  She grew fresh vegetables that were enjoyed by the Sisters and the surrounding community.  Mary was forced to leave her beloved mission and the Sisters after a shooting incident.  Mary shot in self-defense, and was found innocent, but had to find a new home.   Wells Fargo had the mail contract during that time and was looking for someone for the Great Falls to Fort Benton route to deliver the U.S. Mail.  It was a rough and rugged route and would require a person of strong will and great survival skills to maneuver the snowy roads and high winds.  Mary immediately applied at the ripe age of 60 years old.  It was rumored that she could hitch a team of horses faster than the boys half her age and due to her toughness, she was hired!  Mary became the first African American mail carrier in the United States and the second woman.  Mary was proud of the fact that her stage was never held up.  Mary and her mule Moses, never missed a day and it was during this time that she earned the nickname of “Stagecoach,” for her unfailing reliability.  The townspeople adopted Mary as one of their own.  They celebrated her birthday twice a year since she didn’t know the exact date of her real birthday. Mary Fields was known as Black Mary and Stagecoach Mary.  She was considered an eccentric even in these modern times.  She was six feet tall and over 200 pounds.    By the time she was well known in Central Montana, she had a pet eagle, a penchant for whiskey, baseball (which was a new sport at the time) and a heart as big as the gun she was famous for carrying.  Mary wore a buffalo skin dress that she made herself – you might say she drew attention wherever she went – even in a small western pioneer town.  Mary was a local celebrity and her legend and tales of her adventures were known by surrounding communities and neighboring states.   Gary Cooper (the actor) had his mail delivered by Mary as a young boy in Cascade County.   As an adult, he wrote about her for Ebony Magazine in 1955.  Her wrote of her kindness and his admiration for her. The famous western artists Charlie Russell drew a sketch of her.  It was a pen and ink sketch of a mule kicking over a basket of eggs with Mary looking none to happy.   Mary retired her post in 1901 and passed away in 1914.  She is buried at Highland Cemetery at St. Peter’s Mission.  Her grave is marked with a simple cross.

Walipini, Organizing, Edible Indoor Plants, Soapmaking YCH#48

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Gale’s Show Notes and Links:

http://money.msn.com/now/post–bacon-costs-rise-as-piglets-pay-the-price

Walipini  http://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/build-underground-greenhouse-garden-year-round.html

http://www.bensoninstitute.org/Publication/Manuals/Walipini.pdf

3 kind of organizers:  Perfectionist, Functionalist, Creative

Could edible plant be used as decorative.  Crazy idea for curtains from plants.

How is it going feeding dogs real food.  What works for me.

Dog Slaw, sweet potato, green beans, eggs, meat in the crock pot, coconut oil.

http://curedmeats.blogspot.com/2008/08/pancetta-easiest-cured-meat-of-all.html

Divinia’s Notes and Links

ORGANIZATON

 

I talk about the Week 4 of “One Year to an Organized Life”

 

FARM UPDATES

 

There hasn’t been much farming going on around Featherly Farm lately

 

I talk about my plans for starting seeds.

 

SOAP

 

Forgot to talk about soap…opps! Oh well, I’ll have something for the WHAT I FORGOT TO TALK ABOUT LAST TIME category on next weeks show.

 

WHAT I ACCOMPLISHED LAST WEEK

 

I learned the first 11 Hebrew letters  and the three vowels pretty good.  I found a video of the Alef Bet Song…a children’s song…that has been really helpful for me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21-qxk53PvM

 

I have most of the new soap label design completed, and learned how to shrink wrap.

 

Link To Coal/Ash Sifter I made: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jawfvMi32OE&list=HL1390761181&feature=mh_lolz

 

 

PLANS FOR NEXT WEEK

1. Learn the last 11 Hebrew letters and the vowels assigned.

2. Finish soap packaging so I can start making sampler packs and hopefully actually make some.

3. Changed plans on library shelf placement so I can get the 2 other shelf units up and holding books     this week.

4. Install clothes rod and getting my dressing room usable.

5. Do the real work on organizing the kitchen as prescribed in “A Year to an Organized Life”

I’ll be limiting my project lists to 5 projects that I will try to accomplish per week so…The rabbit cages that didn’t get made last week will have to wait…maybe they’ll get on next weeks to do list.

 

We’ve touched on the subject of Fodder Systems recently, and I found this great blogger who share’s her grain sprouting for her chickens experiment with pictures:

 

http://www.workdaychickenpictures.com/workdaychickenpictures/Chickens_And_Gardens_Blog/Entries/2010/12/4_Sprouting_wheat_for_winter_chicken_greens.html

 

http://www.workdaychickenpictures.com/workdaychickenpictures/Chickens_And_Gardens_Blog/Entries/2010/12/18_Update_on_sprouting_wheat.html

 

http://www.workdaychickenpictures.com/workdaychickenpictures/Chickens_And_Gardens_Blog/Entries/2011/1/19_A_feeder_for_the_sprouted_wheat.html

Another link pit type greenhouses with lots of pictures of different examples:

 

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/pit-greenhouses.html

 

 

10 Plants YOU CAN Grow IndoorsYCH #47

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What can you grow indoors for food, spice or medicine.

  1. Most any herb
  2. Peppers -turn into little trees
  3. Curry Leaf Tree
  4. Kaffir Lime
  5. Sprouts
  6. Nine Vegetables
  7. Fruits
  8. Grasses for fodder and juicing
  9. Salad greens
  10. Tomatoes  /www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/winter-tomatoes.aspx

Plant of the Week  Elaeagnus x ebbingei – A Plant for all Reasons

ReNeGaDe PiG!  and moving animals from the flood.

Sheep and goats in search of more food.

More reasons to grow fodder in winter.

Home made Deodorant:

  • 5 TBL (tablespoons/ 15cc = 1 TBL; 5 TBL = 75cc )
  • 1 TBL (15cc) Baking Soda  (can use more if it doesn’t burn you.)
  • 2 TBL (30 cc) Bentonite Clay
  • 5-10 drops essential oil of your pleasing
  • Probiotic of your choice
  • Or apple Cider Vinegar
  • And/or Olive leaf extract
  • 6 TBL (90 cc) Arrowroot Powder
  • Some people use cornstarch instead of arrowroot powder.  But Really?  GMO corn in my pitts.  Eeek!

ORGANIZATION

 

Missed talking about the 2nd week of One Year To An Organized Life.

I go back and run though what I missed talking about last week, before I pick back up on it for this week, week #3

 

FARM UPDATES

 

Soap, soap, and more soap.

 

Started online Biblical Hebrew classes last week. (Which is one of my 13 skills from 13skills.com)

 

Warmer Weather!

 

Bumble Foot Chicken – Dottie’s Progress

 

Sick Chicken – Lil Bit’s Progress

 

Coop Chicken Update

 

Rabbitry Update

Link to bottle attachment I use: http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/601430-pet-lodge-earth-friendly-soda-bottle-waterer.html#.Utw1eftMGHs

 

The fans in the floor vents are working beautifully…posted a video on Featherly Farm’s YouTube channel. Link to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVJvTo2hiK4,

And put a link on the Facebook page ( https://www.facebook.com/pages/Featherly-Farm/346056102119326?ref=hl )

…speaking of…

Featherly Farm’s face book page just passed 100 Likes last night!!!  So excited!

 

PLANS FOR NEXT WEEK

 

  1. Learn required letters for Hebrew Class
  2. Design new soap label, Learn how to shrink wrap soap, and begin getting sampler packs made for friends and family.
  3. Assemble, place, and fill two more library book shelves
  4. Install clothing ‘rod’ shelf in my closet.
  5. Begin making new rabbit cages…ha ha ha…as if!  I’ll be lucky to get part way through the #2 on this list!

 

SOAP MAKING

I explain the difference between Super Fatting, and Lye Discount.

 

Saponification according to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saponification

 

WHAT I FORGOT TO TALK ABOUT LAST TIME

 

Why I want to make deodorant as well as soap: This is how we got on the Mammogram subject

 

Great blog post on this topic at:

 

http://www.sustaincreateandflow.com/how-to-make-your-own-deodorant/

 

Where the blogger lists dangers of ingredients in store bought antiperspirant/deodorant, and they post a recipe for a baking soda free deodorant.

 

I have created a new board on my pintrest page: http://www.pinterest.com/doodlefeather/ for recipes such as this:http://www.pinterest.com/doodlefeather/health-beauty-recipes/

Open Flow Floor Registers with added Fan
to me

Both SFing and discounting lye results in unsaponified oils or fats in the soap because in both cases you add more oils than the lye will react with. Unless you are making soap for household cleaning and plan on wearing gloves to use it, you need to add more oils than will be saponified. Standard for body use is 5%. (I’ve noticed that different lye calculators show different lye amounts for the same SF/discount, Soap Calc and Bramble Berry for example).

When you do a lye discount you melt/combine all oils at one time and equal amounts of the oils in the recipe are left unsaponified, meaning they did not get converted to soap and are in the soap as oil…however, some oils naturally have unsaponifiables…like Canola and Grapeseed.

When you superfat, you choose which oils/fats/butters are left unconverted in the soap (save those unsaponifiables in any other oils used in the base). This is where I add my luxury oils like cocoa butter, and shea butter and things like that

LINKS:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/Backyard.Meat.Rabbits/

My favorite book on raising rabbits on forage:

And his first book which is a great introduction:

And now a 3rd book on rabbits in colonies.  I will talk about it next week.  I do whole heartedly recommend the first two.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 Reasons To Grow Your Own Fodder, Herbs for Cold & Flu YCH#46

Play

Reasons To Grow Fodder  For Your Animals or Sprouts for You:

  • Growing fodder uses less water
    • Less water is needed as compared to growing it in the ground.
    • Water can be recirculated through the system
    • Water can be saved and used to water plants.
  • Feed cost is reduced.
    • A 50 pound sack of feed can make 300 pounds of fodder.
  • Less feed is wasted
    • The whole mat is eaten, even the root mat.
  • You can grow a high yield in just a small space
    • By using shelving you can have trays stacked.
  • You can grow fodder for your animals and sprouts for yourself in the same hydroponic system
  • Sprouted fodder has a higher digestibility.
    • Enzymes are increased.
    • The anti nutrient phytic acid is decreased.
  • Sprouted fodder is higher in nutrients
    • Vitamins, minerals, omega 3, and natural hormones are improved.
  • Fresh fodder for you and your livestock 365 days a year.
  • Here is a link: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/sprouted-fodder.aspx

More on Making your own Dog Food:

Is “people” food unsuitable for dog food?  “Experts” from the dog food industry say not to feed table food to dogs.  They say you can’t get the precise amount of vitamins and nutrients.  Hmmm, doesn’t that sound like the lie told to women about breast milk.  Mother’s milk is not as good as  a formula created by a company that just wants to make money. Most vets will tell you: Your pups will die from  salmonella, e coli, perforated bowel, choking on bones.  Sounds pretty grim; but where does this come from.  We have talked before about how bad store bought dog food is before.  have you ever heard of Pottenger’s Cats?  A 10 year study was done way back in the 1930’s on almost 1000 cats.  The cats had a diet of meat, raw milk, and a small amount of cod liver oil.  They were the healthiest rearing healthy kittens year after year.

http://www.westonaprice.org/health-issues/home-prepared-diets-for-pets

http://aulternatives.com/home-care-tips/diets/healing-diet-for-dogs.html

Back to Basics Facebook Link :  https://www.facebook.com/backtobasics2014I like this page and think you will too.

I am really liking this page, lot of interesting things.  Like the orange peel , vinegar cleaner.

I would also like to ask if anyone was able to sprout the curry leaf seeds I mailed out to those that asked. I have 3 little containers with little curry leaf trees.  http://www.logees.com/pages/articlecurry.asp

Herbs For Cold and Flu  Always good this time of the year.  http://www.blueridgeschool.org/herbs-for-colds-and-flus.htm

Olive Leaf Extract and Why I LOVE It  My favorite herb above all the rest.  http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/01/23/healing-power-olive-leaf/

Silky Chicken  A cool chick that’s totally different!  http://www.odditycentral.com/foods/the-dark-side-of-cooking-naturally-black-chicken.html

Lynda.com

 

 

Mushrooms-morel, lion’s mane, turkey tail #45

Play
  • Things I forgot to talk about last week:

Morel and shaggy mane mushrooms.

New app for mushroom identification:  http://www.amazon.com/NATURE-MOBILE-Mushrooms-PRO/dp/B00AC1Y9KE/ref=pd_sim_mas_1

There is a free version.  I really like having this app on my kindle.

I got motivated again to start and try to identify mushrooms.  I read something that really helped me.  It said to try and learn to identify 6 mushrooms per season.  I was so overwhelmed with the thousands.  But now I feel comfortable with lions mane and turkey tail.  This all started when I found a lion’s mane on Christmas day.  It was a wonderful gift to me.  Lion’s Mane is know as the “smart”  mushroom.  Here is an interesting article by Paul Stamets: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushroom-memory_b_1725583.html

hericium coralloides aka Bear’s Head tooth, hericium eriaceum aka Bearded tooth,

hedgehog or sweettooth is the first one I found on a woodpile of oaks hit by lightning.

I would like to invite anyone interested in identifying mushrooms to the Mushroom Identification Forum on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/117808248330980/465554766889658/?notif_t=group_comment

I have been having a great time with this group.

Moringa, Jicama, and Rutabaga:

Correction from last week.  Moringa is not a legume: http://www.sacredearth.com/ethnobotany/plantprofiles/moringa.php

Growing Jicama  http://greenharvest.com.au/SeedOrganic/VegetableGrowingInformation/JicamaGrowingInformation.html

Rutabaga, I had this all my life but never really appreciated it. I started learning to eat it raw this past year and found it delightful.  I didn’t know it could be eaten raw.  But it is actually mild tasting and low in calories.  Her0e is another point of view:

http://www.thekitchn.com/why-you-should-give-rutabaga-a-chance-183530

Back to Basics Facebook Link

https://www.facebook.com/backtobasics2014  I am really liking this page, lot of interesting things.

And from the above page a link to a different homemade soap recipe :  http://happymoneysaver.com/homemade-dishwasher-detergent/

Dealing with colds and congestion:

The best thing I have found for “sinus trouble” and nasal congestion is the nettie pot.  I have used this for years and love it.  I just mix kosher salt and baking soda (as a buffer) , fill it up with warm water (sometimes a few drops of tea tree oil.)  But everything we do must be done using common sense, so here is an interesting article: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/rare-infection-prompts-neti-pot-warning/?_r=0

http://www.sinucleanse.com/netipotlanding.htm

http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/health_med_fit/despite-two-deaths-neti-pot-use-safe-authorities-say/article_59792cd8-2a9d-11e1-8484-001871e3ce6c.html

http://www.doctoryourself.com/sinuses.html

 

 

 

 

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