5 Plants for Your Homestead YCH#53

Play

 

Osage Orange

http://www.racehorseherbal.com/Wild_Herbs/Osage_Orange/osage_orange.html

http://www.eattheweeds.com/maclura-pomifera-the-edible-inedible-2/

Cornelian Cherry

http://tcpermaculture.blogspot.com/2012/04/permaculture-plants-cornelian-cherry.html

Japanese heartnut

http://www.songonline.ca/nuts/heartnut.htm

Virginia Cherry Shrub

Virginia cherry is a very nice adaptable native cherry that grows to 10 feet tall, but is usually shorter and bushy. It produces red edible cherries in summer that are edible and best when dead ripe. They are best described as sour cherries. I will eat them fresh right off the plant when fully ripe but some prefer to use them in syrup, jams and jellies. They are hardy from zone 3-8. They will grow in full sun or shade.

 

Russian Black Mulberry

One of the most productive, adaptable, fast growing and trouble free  tree available.  Extra sweet, purple-black juicy fruit is great for  pies and eating fresh.  Self-pollinating tree.   Zones  4-9. 2-3’feet tall tree sent.

 

Comments

  1. Greg Harvey says:

    Hi, Gale. You had me kinda interested in this Asian sounding orange you wanted to plant but then I realized it wasn’t O-SAH-GEE but O-SAGE Orange. We have them everywhere here. My young son likes to make them into various sculptures by putting sticks in them. They make you hands very sticky, like pine tar.

    Mother Earth News had an article in the past couple years about how to make an Osage Orange hedge and how to collect the seeds and spread them in a trench to sprout them up.

    I’ve also heard they’ll repel crickets.

    • LOL, I guess I was pronouncing it the Asian way I learned in Hawaii. O-sage does sound much more like the US Southwest. I stand corrected. I have my 3 little plants. Lots of thorns. Eeek.

Speak Your Mind

*

Social Media Icons Powered by Acurax Web Design Company
Visit us on TwitterVisit us on FacebookVisit us on GooglePlusVisit us on PinterestVisit us on YouTubeVisit us on LinkedinCheck our RSS Feed