Archives for November 2013

Meet Divinia, Herbs, Mushrooms For Medicine, Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar In Livestock, Ruminants Fed on Pasture Only,YCH #42

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CONTACT DIVINIA divinia.featherly@gmail.com

Link to Paul Staments  The Future is Fungi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=cwLviP7KaAc

Who needs Obamacare – try the natural Pharmacy

I buy herbs, but want to grow my own.  There are some companies that sell herbs with nothing in them except fillers or something that isn’t even listed.

This one is an overview of some great medicinal mushrooms and info on killing carpenter ants and termites with mushrooms.  Very interesting!

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/11/05/science/herbal-supplements-are-often-not-what-they-seem.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuHCtRTC8JY

Apple cider vinegar for livestock Health

http://wickslivestock.com/articles-folk-medicine-for-livestock

Paleo Breakfast muffins

Gene Sollock Videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WZZOiwjXYE

http://intensivegrazing.tamu.edu/publications/sheepandgoats.pdf

http://intensivegrazing.tamu.edu/publications/establishyearroundgrazing.pdf

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What to do with all that venison:

http://honest-food.net/2010/08/15/venison-charcuterie/

Rabbit stew recipe

http://honest-food.net/2012/01/06/greek-rabbit-stew/

Raising Rabbits and Meat Chickens with Cris CantinYCH#41

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I have a special treat today.  An interview with Cris Cantin.  Cris is a homesteader that lives on a 1/4 acre in Wisconsin.  She raises most of her own vegetables, meat rabbits and chickens.  She was nice enough to be interviewed and share a recipe and pics of her Rabbit Taj Mahal.  There is also a link to her website.

Green Rabbit Chili (yes, really.)
You’ll need: one rabbit, dressed for the pot, about 3 pounds  maximum; one bottle of good beer; large can of green enchilada sauce;  two small cans of salsa verde; one can of diced green chiles; one large  can of white hominy; one teaspoon each of cayenne pepper, cumin,  coriander; one-and-a-half teaspoons kosher salt; two teaspoons minced,  dried garlic; a couple of dried jalapeno slices or similar hot pepper (I grew these in the garden, and dehydrated them). Start the process by placing the rabbit into the crockpot, and  pouring over the bottle of beer.  Cook all day on low heat, until the  meat is done and very tender.  Remove from crockpot, and chill in the  fridge overnight.
The next morning, pick all the meat from the bones, shred using  two forks, and return to the crockpot.  Add all the seasonings and mix  well.  Add the green enchilada sauce and salsa verde, hominy, and diced  green chiles.  (Note:  I grew a ton of tomatillos one year, and made  vast amounts of salsa verde and enchilada sauce–so much better than  store-bought!)  Stir well, and add enough water until it is a loose soup consistency, around 3 or 4 cups.  Cover and cook on low all day, until  the flavors have combined and the chili is nice and hot.  Serve with  cornbread or biscuits of your choice.
When I’m asked to bring chili to an event, this is my go-to chili  recipe.  Not only is it delicious, and uniquely green, but it gives  people the opportunity to try rabbit meat in an approachable way.  It  always gets rave reviews, even from people who don’t usually eat any  meat!

Just an aside:  I have a little website, that connects in to my blog as well, if you wanted to check it out or share it on your site.  I go on and on about my chickens/rabbits/and everything else, so its almost as entertaining as talking with me!  🙂
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Parasites in goat, sheep foot rot, Gluten Free Pizza, Kim CheeYCH#40

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http://ed.ted.com/lessons/richard-st-john-the-power-of-passion

This week I will talk about update on goats in the ICU.  The  2 babes are back on pasture and looking fat and healthy.  Then my male Boer went down with parasites.  This seems to be an ongoing battle.  He is so thin, he may not make it.  We  put him on the oak leaf diet, with worming, a little feed and daily doses of probiotics.  His stool is starting to return to normal and he has put on a little weight.  He still has a long way to go though.

The rotten feet sheep are back out on pasture too and completely healed up.  Clorox and copper sulfate.  And lots of hoof trimming.  The Barbados and Katahdins are all together now.  And that male Katahdin is extremely happy with his little herom of ladies!

I also wanted to let you know how my corned beef turned out.  It was awesome.  For once when I cooked it I had more meat than cabbage.  and it wasn’t fatty and shrinking down to about 1/2 as the store kind.  It was a little salty, which I remedied by adding water.  My husband and son loved it too.  And we can’t wait to try it with venison.  Like Carl on Slingblade says, put some mustard on it.  Technically he was talking about “fried potatoes”  but you get my gist!  UmHuh!

We tried the Korean Sweet potatoes we  bought in Atlanta and I’ll tell you all about it.  I will definitely try my hand at growing these.

As fall is really starting to come in now it’s time to plan for growing food in the winter.  I walk by my trumpet flower tree and see beautiful yellow trumpets with a wonderful fragrant citrusy smell, and it is hard to believe cold weather is just around the corner.  Then as I walk in the garden and see a little cold damage to the plants and yellowing of the banana leaves I know it is inevitable.  I do still have lots of bittermelon, Malabar spinach going gangbusters.  It even runs out on the ground and my “yard pig” is totally enjoying it.  Also basil, Thai basil, pineapple sage, rosemary, egg plant – 3 kinds, okra, comfrey, horseradish all going strong.  I have been feeding a little comfrey to the sick goats.  Guess I need to cut those herbs and preserve them for later use.  I think my absolute favorite is that Thai Basil.  Cinnamon like anise type flavor.  Man I drop it in my sweet tea and stir fry.  It is so yummy!

Bud grafting and chip budding video http://blip.tv/midfex/tutorial-t-bud-and-chip-bud-fruit-tree-grafting-techniques-350977

With gardening chores mostly behind me, I am turning to new things to do around the homestead.  I love sushi, but it is so expensive.  I have made it in the past and it was a little wonky.  But I tried again after watching several You Tube videos and finding recipes.  I was very pleased with the results.  I also found a recipe for Paleo Sushi.  No rice, just meat and veggies.  I think I will stick to regular sushi though and just have it as a treat.

I have been thinking a lot about the podcast.  And I feel I really need to have more guests on.  I just loved the interaction when I had guest previously.  My computer went haywire and I couldn’t do interviews.  But I am ready to try again.  I would really love to have a co host.  It would be fun to bounce around ideas.  I have been facebooking and emailing people that have impressed me.  And hopefully I will have some good interviews to share.  But if anyone feels they could be a good co host via Skype, I would like to give it a shot.

I have a little project I really want to do.  I have probably 200 spices here.  Needless to say I have some difficulty in organizing and storing them.  I have read some people store them in the freezer.  I know that would be optimal for the spices, but a huge hassle.  So I have been thinking about what spice rack would be best for me.  I have a little stand right now with over a hundred disorganized spices.  I also have more in plastic containers as the shelf can’t hold them all.  I have put them in alphabetical order several times. Whenever I do this they always get inadvertently knocked over.  LOL, as soon as I gave up on this, they have never been knocked over again.  Funny how life is like that. My idea is to put up a magnetized spice “rack”  Basically a large piece of metal covering the wall they are at now.  Then you just glue magnet to the spice bottles and hang them up.  I would like some little fancy shaped bottles.  I just haven’t found what I want yet.  I was thinking I could even make them look like a bee hive or something.  All kind of great ideas.  If you have an idea or suggestion, or a link to some cheap bottles please post it.  I may end up just buying cheapo bottles.  But it would be really nice to get ones like I want. And I would love to have glass – not plastic.

Here is one for the fridge, but much to pricey for 24 bottles: http://fab.com/product/gneiss-spice-hex-spice-set-137747?utm_source=google_pla&utm_campaign=pla&utm_content=Kitchen%20Tools%20%3E%20Spice%20Racks%20%26%20Holders&utm_term=&utm_type=p&ltb=off&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=137747

Well I just ordered 200 hexagon bottles from here https://www.specialtybottle.com/index.aspx  This was the best price I could find anywhere, $138.90 including 40 bucks shipping for 2 oz.  hexagon bottles with gold tops.  I will update you on the next podcast.   I am really excited about making my magnetic spice rack!

I just thought I would write quick blogpost on making Kim Chee as I have had requests for the recipe.  I PLAN to update this later with pics and such.  I hope this helps it is just quick way to get answers.  It is more of a process, than a recipe.  But here is how I do it:

Use a Napa (also called Chinese) cabbage. If you don’t have a kitchen scale just weigh it at the store on their scale.  A large cabbage is usually around 5 # or so.   For each 5# cabbage use 3 TBL. salt (or 0.6 TBL for each pound.)  I am actually experimenting with a little less salt now.  The more salt you use the crunchier it is.  Sometimes it has been too salty.  Of course you can always add more water if this happens.   It must be kosher or pickling salt.  Don’t use iodized table salt.  Cut the cabbage up and massage the salt in.

Add at least 3 inches of ginger root.  Lots of garlic. (Like a whole head)  And add some kind of hot pepper.  I just often us the crushed red pepper.  just mix it all together in a large bowl.  Usually I just mix the cabbage and salt. then add the rest of the stuff in the jar.

You have to press it down really tight. water will start coming up and the cabbage needs to stay under the water.  So weight it down with something.  I use a pimento jar.  I then just put the lid on loose enough to let CO2 escape but tight enough to press the jar down.  If you don’t have enough water building up to cover the cabbage, you can make some up.  For 1 qt of water add 2-3 TBL salt and you can top up any fermented veggies with that.

I cover my jar with a bag to keep the light out.  I then sit it in a plastic dish pan.  Most times when it ferments it will bubble out some liquid.  If you smell a dead rat, it is probably your fermenting cabbage. LOL

Taste it in 2 or 3 days and when it is sour enough put the lid on tight and stick it in the fridge. The warmer your house is the faster it ferments.  You don’t want to do it in a really hot place.  Comfortable room temp is fine. Enjoy and I hope you get hooked like me.  I even make fruit Kim Chee.  It is so yummy!  I am going to add this to the website under the podcast where I talk about fermenting in case you need to find the instructions again

 

 

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